Crane Safety Tips

Cranes are essential for workers in construction, manufacturing, warehousing and other industries, but are highly more hazardous than any other tool.  Extensive training and following crane safety standards creates a better working environment for workers and anyone around the worksite. Below is a list of common crane hazards and preventative measures you can take to create a safer work area:

  • Being aware of electrical lines is critical when operating a crane. The metal in the crane is an excellent conductor and can cause a fatal electrocution if accidentally hit against electrical lines
  • Material lifted with a crane has the potential of falling off even after it has been secured Employees below crane should avoid working in the area and wear hard hats along with other appropriate PPE
  • Although cranes can lift an astounding amount of weight, it is important for crane operator to know the weight limit of each crane. Crane operators and loaders should also keep track of how much weight is being added or removed to avoid overloading
  • When cranes twist or move to get the load where it needs to go, it create pinch or crush points where someone could be seriously injured. It is important to be cautious of surroundings when moving a load to avoid accidental injury to those around
  • Crane operators should make sure area is cleared when dropping a load to avoid crushing objects or injuring someone. Some loads are heavy enough to crush vehicles so it is important to remember to never work under a crane load, even with PPE
  • Requiring workers to wear a hard hat at all times ensures they are safe if material falls from a crane load. You can’t predict when this will happen, but you can prepare for it.
  • Providing workers with eye protections prevents them from having temporary blindness caused by dust or debris
  • Hand protection keeps workers safe from pinches or being crushed

Using a crane is hazardous, but with crane safety implementation and proper training, workers are able to operate them with confidence and reduce the possibility of injury drastically.

At Nova Medical Centers we specialize in occupational health. We understand the importance of informing employers and employees of safety regulations.  We take pride in providing exceptional services to our patients and clients. Contact us for more information. Our friendly staff and team of experts are here to meet all your occupational health needs.

 

Written by Nayda Sanchez

Hurricane Cleanup Safety

Hurricane season is coming to an end, but areas impacted by heavy storms are beginning the process of rebuilding communities which starts with hurricane cleanup. Whether or not your area was affected by a hurricane this season, it is never a bad idea to stay informed about cleanup hazards. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has compiled a list of tips to ensure workers stay safe and healthy while cleaning up after natural disasters:

  • Use a wooden stick or pole to check flooded areas for pits and holes before entering
  • Conduct a preliminary worksite inspection to verify stability before entering a flooded or formerly flooded building
  • Do not touch downed power lines or any object or water that is in contact with such lines
  • Treat all power lines as energized
  • Beware of overhead and underground powerlines when clearing debris
  • Establish a plan for contacting medical personnel in the event of an emergency
  • Report any obvious hazards such as downed power lines, frayed electric wires, gas leaks or snakes to appropriate authorities
  • Always wear watertight boots with steel toe and insole gloves, long pants and safety glasses during cleanup operations
  • Clean, cool water and sun screen should be available for workers

Educating workers on hurricane cleanup safety allows them to work cautiously at the workplace or when providing assistance to their neighbors and communities. Staying informed about cleanup hazards reduces risk of injury for everyone involved.

Nova Medical Centers solely focuses on occupational health. We pride ourselves in providing exceptional services and helping our clients prioritize their health and safety above all else. Communicating up-to-date OSHA safety regulations and trends to employers and employees allows us to assists clients in creating a safer workplace environment. Contact Us  to learn more about any of our services. Our skilled and friendly staff members are ready to meet all your occupational health needs.

 

Written by Nayda Sanchez

Preventing Electrical Accidents in the Workplace

Working with electricity has become so customary that we don’t give much thought to how heavily we depend on a reliable source of electricity to perform daily job functions. Some employees like engineers and electricians work with electricity directly while others such as office workers and sales people work with electricity indirectly.  Electrical shock, electrocution, fires and explosions are all risks workers are exposed to day-to-day.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recognizes these hazards and has designed standards to protect employees from potential injuries. Below are a few electrical hazards prevention tips

  • Protection provided by insulation

Shocks, fires and short circuits could all be prevented by using insulators such as glass, mica, rubber, or plastic to coat metals and other conductors to reduce the flow of electrical current. Effective insulation must be suitable for the voltage used and other environmental factors like moisture, oil, gasoline, corrosive fumes or other substances that could cause the insulator to fail.

  • Guarding electric equipment

Guarding involves locating or enclosing electric equipment to make sure people don’t accidently come into contact with it. Ensuring only authorized employees qualified to work with electrical equipment has access to it is part of effective guarding.

  • Grounding

Grounding an electrical tool or system means to intentionally create a low-resistance path that connects to the earth which prevents the buildup of voltages that could cause an electrical accident. OSHA recommends using guarding as secondary protective measure to substantially reduce the risk of electrical hazards.

  • Circuit Protection

Circuit protection devices limit or stop the flow of current automatically in the event of ground fault, overload, or short circuit in the wiring system. Fuses, circuit breakers, ground-fault circuit interrupters, and arc-fault circuit interrupters are all examples of circuit protection devices.

Unintentionally ignoring electrical hazards can lead to serious bodily injuries. By taking proper precaution when dealing with tools or areas that have potential electrical hazards, you ensure that you create a safe and healthful environment for employees.

At Nova Medical Centers, we solely focus on occupational health. We pride ourselves in delivering exceptional services and helping our clients prioritize their health and safety above all else. We ensure clients are up-to-dated with OSHA regulations at our Nova Lunch and Learns . Contact us for more information about any of our services. Our skilled and friendly staff members are ready to meet all your occupational health needs.

Written by Nayda Sanchez

Hurricane Season is Not Over

According to National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center, hurricane season reaches its peak between August and October in both the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Atlantic Basin. You can’t rely on forecast to determine whether or not you should prepare for a hurricane. Let’s face it; Mother Nature is so unpredictable that not even experts can accurately predict her next move.  Staying prepared is the best route. Below are 3 tips to prepare for a hurricane at your workplace:

  1. Having an evacuation plan in place ensures workers can get to safety in case a hurricane affects area. A thorough evacuation plan should include:
  • Conditions that will activate the plan
  • Chain of command
  • Emergency functions and who will perform them
  • Specific evacuation procedures, including routes and exits
  • Procedures for accounting for personnel, customers and visitors
  • Equipment for personnel
  1. Prepare your employees

Having a plan is not enough. Participating in crisis drills where employees practice the evacuation plan better prepares your employees if a hurricane does occur. Constantly practicing and discussing your plan expresses the importance your company places on your employee’s safety.

  1. Test your emergency communication plans

Sending an email, a text alert or testing a public address system ensures you are able to provide critical information to employees if an emergency occurs.  Be sure to include identifiers such as “THIS IS A TEST” to avoid confusion.

Emergency Action Plans help communicate procedures during an emergency to all employees within an organization. Engagement and implementation of emergency plans assists in illuminating confusion during natural disasters. You may not be able to predict when a hurricane might strike, but you can control how you prepare for one.

Nova Medical Centers focuses solely on occupational health. We pride ourselves in providing exceptional services and helping our clients prioritize their health and safety above all else. Our Nova Lunch and Learns  are designed to communicate up-to-date safety regulations to employers and employees and are hosted at one of our facilities regularly. Topics include hurricane or natural disaster preparedness, preparing for an active shooter situation and more.  Contact Us  to learn more about our next event.

 

Written by Nayda Sanchez

Employment Drug Testing

Drug testing promotes positive work culture

 According to a survey conducted by the Society of Human Resources, 57% of employers implement drug testing to determine if employees or job applicants are using drugs. Employers overlook drug testing because it’s not required by the state they are operating in, it’s too costly or they believe it’s not a viable investment. However, the benefits can be impactful.  Listed below are significant benefits of drug testing:

  • Creating a drug-free environment builds a safe workplace. Performing job functions while under the influence makes it more dangerous for employees and their colleagues. Using heavy equipment or driving a truck requires an employee to be alert; being under the influence will increase the likelihood of injury.
  • Drug screenings in companies has led to an increase of productivity within their employees. Drug problems can cause an individual to lose focus of their responsibilities and their commitment to their employer. Being absent and lack of punctuality are linked to drug use. Eliminating drugs from the equation helps shape a goal-oriented, productive atmosphere.
  • Employers may be eligible for discounts on workers compensation insurance for maintaining a drug-free work place by drug testing workers
  • Drug testing encourages a healthier lifestyle not only at the workplace, but also in employee’s personal lives.

Drug testing can lead to impactful company cultural changes. It is a representation of the restriction of drug use at the workplace and a great way to showcase company culture even before an employee is hired.  Reliable colleagues, motivating leaders, and a supportive learning environment are all desirable characteristics for job seekers.  Implementing a drug-free workplace shows employees that you not only care about their success, but their overall health. It is a key component in protecting the safety, health and welfare of employees.

At Nova Medical Centers  our teams of medical professionals specialize in ADA, DOT, NIOSH, OSHA and other state and regular federal regulations which govern the occupational medicine industry. Our sole focus on occupational health allows us to provide exceptional pre-employment services. We pride ourselves in tailoring our care to every single client. Contact us  today for more information about our pre-employment services.  Our friendly staff and team of experts are here to meet all of your occupational health needs.

Written by Nayda Sanchez

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